cross-disciplinary

Planning for Writing Instruction

1 views 0

Author: Mark Overmeyer

Summary: In this brief tip from his book, When Writing Workshop Isn’t Working, Mark Overmeyer describes a process of collaborative backward planning that provides a scope and sequence for the year that meets district curriculum requirements, allows for the study of genres connected to various disciplines and units (e.g., research, narrative, memoir, and technical writing), and culminates in a student-generated magazine that draws from strategies learned throughout the year. This would be a useful resource for school-based planning teams as well as for professional development focused on writing workshop and cross-curricular planning and assessment.
CONTINUE READING

Putting the “Shop” in Reading Workshop: Building Reading Stamina

1 views 0

Author: Amanda N. Gulla

Summary: How might teachers motivate students who identify as “non-readers” to find purpose in reading? In this article, Amanda Gulla, a teacher consultant with the New York City Writing project offers a portrait of the ways in which co-teachers orchestrated an independent, reading-workshop model classroom for their urban CTE (career and technical education) students who developed fluency and agency as readers. Future teachers and those interested in exploring solutions to the challenges of reading instruction will enjoy this easy-to-read ethnographic study.
CONTINUE READING

Reading, Writing, and Mentor Texts: Imagining Possibilities (NWP Radio)

2 views 0

Summary: Mentor texts can support writers and inspire writing in all genres in the classroom and beyond. This NWP Radio show is of particular interest to study groups and teacher leaders designing professional development that explores the use of mentor texts to support writing in academic disciplines. Presenters share resources for identifying and using effective mentor texts. Highlights include: a definition of mentor texts (2:00); a discussion of using picture books as mentor texts (14:01); advice about choosing 15-25 texts as anchors for the year (15:50); a discussion of the concept of “”deeper writing”” (24:40); and using mentor texts as resources for teacher inquiry (36:43). Also included is a discussion of how a broad definition of “”text”” can enrich a thematic approach to history along with an example of using texts in a history unit on The “”Other”” in America. Included links contain valuable resources on mentor texts in general and in history in particular.
CONTINUE READING

Developing Teaching Teams to Integrate the Curriculum

7 views 0

Author: Carla Gubitz Jankowski

Summary: Integrating high school curriculum isn’t easy, but Moffett award winner Gubitz Jankowski affirms it is worth the effort and produces powerful results for students and teachers. Briefly describing how one school reorganized its freshman class into 100-student “houses,” with each house sharing a team of teachers from different curricular areas, the article is valuable as a thoughtful articulation of why curricular integration is a good idea.
CONTINUE READING

Working at the Intersections of Formal and Informal Science and Literacy Education

3 views 0

Author: Tanya Baker and Becky Carroll

Summary: This resource describes the multi-faceted work of the NWP (and partners) Intersections Project which supported local partnerships to design programming and innovative projects that connected science and literacy learning. The authors present two cases and their benefits to participants: one focuses on enhancing museum/science field trips and the other describes a STEAM partnership project (Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts, Mathematics) between a writing project and a local science/engineering “discovery” center. Video, art, and student reactions are embedded. This resource could provide schools and teachers with ideas about partnerships with area museums or science centers, as well as literacy integration for science or STEM learning.
CONTINUE READING

Book Review: English Learners, Academic Literacy, and Thinking: Learning in the Challenge Zone

8 views 0

Author: Debra Schneider

Summary: How can we best support English learners in classrooms where rigorous curricula focus on intellectual practices across content areas? How can we engage in practices that enable students to construct rather than reproduce knowledge, develop deep understanding of disciplinary knowledge and forge connections between school and the outside world? In this review of Pauline Gibbons’s book, Debra Schneider shares insights and successful strategies emerging from her own practice and study group related to the chapter on Academic Literacy [see PDF], suggesting that teaching content “deeply” enables teaching standards in authentic ways. An excellent resource for study groups, inquiry groups, or those leading professional development.
CONTINUE READING

How to Build Better Engineers: A Practical Approach to the Mechanics of Text

48 views 0

Author: Ron E. Smelser

Summary: How do engineers write—in what ways, for what audiences, and for what purposes? How do we as teachers support novices in developing an understanding that learning to write clearly to communicate arguments in proposals and presentations may make all the difference in moving an idea to a product that is economically and practically feasibile? This article presents a structure that emulates what engineers encounter in a peer-review proposal process. Those planning and leading workshops grounded in real-world practices for aspiring engineers or other related professions will find useful ideas here.
CONTINUE READING

The Authenticity Spectrum: The Case of a Science Journalism Writing Project

20 views 0

Author: Angela Kohnen

Summary: Although learning to write like science reporters was initially designed to help students develop scientific literacy, the SciJourn project became much more — a key to high school students’ engagement as learners, researchers, and writers and their teachers’ opportunity to explore “real world” genre-based writing assignments and assessment. This article provides a rich discussion with specific examples for learning to develop assignments and learning experiences that take into account “functional authenticity.” Those designing professional development, grants, summer institutes, or study groups on topics such as disciplinary literacy, genre, or authentic learning/writing will find ample food for thought!
CONTINUE READING

Historical Fiction in English and Social Studies Classrooms: Is It a Natural Marriage?

12 views 0

Author: KaaVonia Hinton, Yonghee Suh, Lourdes Colón-Brown, and Maria O’Hearn

Summary: What happens when history and ELA teachers form a study group to develop understandings of disciplinary literacy and ways this new knowledge might affect each person’s practice? As members read and reflected together on historical fiction and nonfiction, they found that reading texts from both disciplines helped to more fully contextualize a historical period and promote historical empathy. This piece could generate ideas for forming similar study groups and provide an opportunity for teachers to delve into questions and issues related to disciplinary literacy within a professional development forum.
CONTINUE READING

Content Area Literacy and Learning: Selected Sources for the 21st Century, An Annotated Bibliography

13 views 0

Author: Judith Rodby

Summary: Those looking for materials related to content area and cross-disciplinary reading may find this annotated bibliography useful. It is organized around three general categories of research and practice: 1) generalized reading strategies; 2) adapting/applying generalized reading strategies to specific content areas (math, science, history); and 3) content area-specific approaches that focus on genres, discourses, and identities implicit in the ways of knowing in subject areas and disciplines.
CONTINUE READING