WRITE / LEARN / LEAD BLOG

AUTHOR: Kate Rowley
FROM THE BLOG: Kate Rowley writes on how a team of UCLA Writing Project teacher-consultants worked to bring meaningful literacy and writing experiences to English learners whose classrooms often exist in isolation, using resources from our College, Career, and Community Writers Program (C3WP).

Continue Reading

AUTHOR: Nicole Mirra
FROM THE BLOG: From Connected Learning to Connected Teaching, a special issue of CITE Journal, examines the need to bring the transformative principles of connected learning into teacher education, and explores some of the work already underway.

Continue Reading

AUTHORS: Marcie Wolfe and Pat Fox
FROM THE BLOG: The leaders of the Write/Learn/Lead Knowledge Base team introduce the site, explain what’s in it and how it came to be, and offer suggestions for navigating and using it.

Continue Reading

AUTHOR: Kathy Kurtze
FROM THE BLOG: Chippewa River Writing Project teacher-consultant Kathy Kurtze explores how the College, Career, and Community Ready Writers Program’s curriculum is perfect for harnassing the energy of her social and demonstrative middle schoolers into civil discourse and thoughtful argument writing.

Continue Reading

AUTHOR: Bud Hunt
FROM THE BLOG: A reflection from Bud Hunt on NWP’s Building New Pathways to Leadership initiative.

Continue Reading

AUTHOR: Monica Avila
FROM THE BLOG: Central Arizona Writing Project teacher-consultant Monica Avila shares her experience representing her Writing Project site in meetings with congressional staffers at the NWP Spring Meeting, covering her preparations, meeting strategies, and follow-up approach.

Continue Reading

AUTHOR: Stephanie West-Puckett
FROM THE BLOG: Stephanie West-Puckett and her graduate students name and defeat persistent zombie ideas with help from Bad Ideas About Writing, a free, open-source textbook outlining 61 bad ideas about writing and writing instruction that just won’t go away.

Continue Reading

AUTHOR: Tom Fox
FROM THE BLOG: With the thriving matsutake mushroom as a metaphor, Tom Fox reflects on the process of scaling up programs without imposing uniform ideas, and the risks and changes to take and make in the process.

Continue Reading